Iran: Annual report on the death penalty 2017

IRAN HUMAN RIGHTS (MARCH 13, 2018): The 10th annual report on the death penalty in Iran by Iran Human Rights (IHR) and ECPM shows that in 2017 at least 517 people were executed in the Islamic Republic of Iran. 
This number is comparable with the execution figures in 2016 and confirms the relative reduction in the use of the death penalty compared to the period between 2010 and 2015. 
Nevertheless, with an average of more than one execution every day and more than one execution per one million inhabitants in 2017, Iran remained the country with the highest number of executions per capita.
2017 Annual Report at a Glance:
At least 517 people were executed in 2017, an average of more than one execution per day111 executions (21%) were announced by official sources.Approximately 79% of all executions included in the 2017 report, i.e. 406 executions, were not announced by the authorities.At least 240 people (46% of all executions) were executed for murder charges - 98 more than in 2016.At le…

Iran judiciary in conflict over executions

Public execution in Iran
In 2015, Iran was executing more than one person a day.
In 2015, Iran was executing more than one person a day.

Despite a decrease in the number of executions, Iran continues to be the nation with one of the highest rates of executions in the world, mostly for drug-related crimes. According to Amnesty International, Iran executed a reported 567 people in 2016. In 2015, the number was 977. Still, at 567 people, Iran was executing more than one person a day. This issue has been openly discussed in one of the unlikeliest places: Iran’s judiciary.

Hojat al-Islam Gholam Hossein Mohseni Ejei, the spokesman for Iran's judiciary, in a Aug. 9 speech addressed Iran’s high execution rate with respect to drug-related crimes. “Do we want to solve all of our problems with punishments and increasing punishments?” he asked. “Some say, you have increased the punishment but there is still crime. On the issue of illegal drugs, we have laws from many years ago and many times [the punishment] has been increased and now they want to decrease it.”

Mohseni Ejei, a hard-liner who has held important positions in the Islamic Republic, including that of prosecutor general, intelligence minister and prosecutor for the Special Court for Clergy, also criticized Western organizations regarding their condemnations of Iran’s high execution rate. “Even if the executions for drug-related charges is lowered, Westerners will not say that we did right,” he said.

While Mohseni Ejei criticized those who want to eliminate the death penalty, he said he did not want his criticism of these people to be viewed as his supporting capital punishment. “I do not want to support the death penalty,” he said. He indicated that it might be a good idea to not resort to the death penalty so much in drug cases.

He asked for research studies to determine "what our goal is with the executions,” and urged that alternative punishments be put in place if the death penalty is abolished — punishments that “do not have the negative effects of the death penalty.” 

This is not the first time that Mohseni Ejei has addressed the high execution rates in Iran. He has a history of making mildly critical remarks without ever completely backing away from the death penalty. In May 2014, in his position as prosecutor general, he suggested only punishing the heads of drug-smuggling networks. Last month, he said that the death penalty should be one of a choice of punishments, and that treatment and prevention should be part of the mix. He said that if there were no death penalty at all, the situation with Iran’s drug use and smuggling would be worse.

Iran’s parliament approved a proposal in July that would amend the country’s anti-drug laws with respect to small-time drug use. The Guardian Council would need to approve any bill passed by parliament. Regardless, Iran’s judiciary chief, Ayatollah Sadegh Larijani, has remained steadfast in his support of the country’s use of executions. In September 2016, Larijani unequivocally denied that Iran would eliminate the death penalty for drug smugglers.

Source: Al-Monitor, August 10, 2017

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